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November 8, 2016 — California General Election
Ballot and voting information for the state of California.
This is an archive of a past election.

District 3California State SenateNovember 8, 2016California General Election

November 8, 2016California General Election

California State SenateDistrict 3

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Election Results

  • 100% of precincts reporting (740/740).

About this office

State senators introduce and vote on new laws, hold hearings, approve appointments to state agencies, and approve the state budget. They are elected to four-year terms.
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Who’s Running?

For this office, only the two candidates who get the most votes in the primary election appear in the general election. This is because of California's "top two" system. In some cases, the two candidates may be from the same political party.
Candidates are sorted in order of election results.
Democratic
State Assemblymember/Businessman
207,927 votes (58.1%)Winning
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  • Increased targeted investements for early childhood education, career techical education and higher education.
  • Climate and water issues
  • Increased attention to infrastructure needs while maintaining fiscal accountability
Profession:State Assemblymember/Businessman
Assemblymember, California State Assembly — Elected position (2004current)
County Supervisor, Napa County Board of Supervisors — Elected position (20002008)
General Manager, US Filter, Inc. (19982003)
President/CEO, Diversified Water Systems, Inc. (19841995)
California State University, Chico Bachelor of Science, Business Management (1978)
Honorary Trustee, Queen of the Valley Medical Center Foundation (2000current)
Honorary Member, Napa Valley Hospice and Adult Day Services (2006current)
Founder, Wolfe Center, Teen Drug and Alcohol Center (20042008)
Founding Board Member, Children's Health Initiative (20022006)

Bill Dodd currently serves the people of District 4 in the California State Assembly. During his public service Bill has built a reputation for delivering solutions on issues affecting real people. He has led the way on legislation to deal with gender pay equity, worked to designate the Berryessa Snow Mountain area as a national monument, co-wrote the law creating an Earned Income Tax Credit in California, and helped secure $400 million dollars for career technical education throughout the state.

Prior to serving in the Assembly, Bill served on the Napa County Board of Supervisors for 14 years. He also represented the cities and county of Napa on the Metropolitan Transportation Commission including a two-year term as chairman of this powerful regional body. In addition, Bill served as an Honorary Commander for the 60th Air Mobility Wing at Travis Air Force Base. Other boards and commission service included the Chair of the Local Agency Formation Commission of Napa County, Chair of the Napa County League of Governments, Chair of the Napa County Transportation Planning Agency, and Chair of the Napa County Flood Control and Water Conservation District.

Bill graduated from Justin-Siena High School and California State University, Chico. He went on to own and operate one of the largest full-service Culligan Water operations in California. During this time, Bill served as President of the national and state trade associations: the Water Quality Association and the Pacific Water Quality Association

  • over 200 Mayors, Supervisors, Councilmembers and School Board members throughout the District
  • Governor Jerry Brown
  • US Senator Dianne Feinstein
  • Attorney General Kamala Harris
  • Congressman Mike Thompson
  • Congressman Mark Desaunier
  • Congressman Jerad Huffman
  • California Labor Federation
  • California Small Business Association
Total money raised: $1,371,318

Below are the top contributors that gave money to support the candidate(s).

1
Farmers Insurance Group
$25,400
2
Sheet Metal Workers Local 104
$16,900
3
California Association of Realtors
$16,000
3
Northern California Carpenters Regional Council
$16,000
4
California Faculty Association
$15,230

By State:

California 86.42%
District of Columbia 2.38%
Texas 1.90%
Illinois 1.88%
Other 7.42%
86.42%

By Size:

Large contributions (98.83%)
Small contributions (1.17%)
98.83%

By Type:

From organizations (72.91%)
From individuals (27.09%)
72.91%27.09%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.
— May 23, 2016 Bill Dodd for Senate

This is a TV Ad produced by the campaign describing the widespread support for Assemblymember Dodd throughout the district. 

— May 23, 2016 Bill Dodd for Senate

This is a TV ad produced by the campaign describing the Assemblymember's economic plans.

— May 23, 2016 Bill Dodd for Senate

The spot emphasizes Dodd’s focus on securing a strong middle class and the need for better schools, jobs and other essential components that lead to opportunity and a chance at a better life. 

— May 23, 2016 Bill Dodd for Senate

This spot describes the Assemblymember's plans to ensure that California offers a fair shake for anyone who works hard. 

Democratic
Social Worker
149,701 votes (41.9%)
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  • Protect the increasingly large population of aging Californians and create the first committee on Aging and Long Term Care in the Senate.
  • Protect the environment and invest in innovative ways to conserve water instead of shipping it south.
  • Promote social justice and civil rights for the most vulnerable of our communities and those who don't have a powerful voice in Sacramento.
Profession:Social Worker/Assemblywoman (Fmr.)
California State Assemblymember, California State Assembly (20082014)
Assemblymember, California State Assembly, District 4 — Elected position (20082014)
Yolo County Supervisor, District 4, 2003-2008, Yolo County Board of Supervisors — Elected position (20032008)
Yolo County Supervisor, Yolo County (19992003)
District Director, Yolo County Board of Supervisors, District 4, Yolo County (19992003)
Chair, Yolo County Democratic Party (19982000)
Equal Employment/Affirmative Action Officer, San Diego County Department of Social Services (19891994)
University of Southern California MA, Social Work (1974)
University of Colorado Bachelors of Art, Psychology (1972)
Member, National Association of Social Workers, CA Chapter (1994current)
Member, Yolo Basin Foundation Board (20032008)
Chair, Yolo County Democratic Central Committee (19982000)
Member, Yolo County Health Council (19981999)
Member, City of Davis Personnel Board (19961998)

Prior to her Assembly service, Mariko served for nine years on the Yolo County Board of Supervisors—four years as District Director and then for five years as the Supervisor for District 4. During that time, she consistently fought for the protection of civil rights, open space and agricultural preservation, and the inclusion of underserved communities in our educational system, the economy and the political process. Her education and experience as a professional social worker drives her leadership on issues affecting poor and vulnerable populations, including seniors and persons with disabilities and those who care for them. Mariko is also known for her advocacy for small businesses and for the protection of the environment and animal welfare, earning frequent recognition for her consistent legislative track record in these areas.

Mariko was born in Denver, Colorado after her family’s release from the Manzanar War Relocation Center, one of ten WWII Japanese-American internment camps. She attended inner-city public schools in the Five Points Neighborhood and was the first in her family to graduate from college – earning a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder and a Masters in Social Work from the University of Southern California.

Mariko’s experience also includes a decade in Washington, D.C. in federal service—first with the U.S. Census Bureau working on the undercount reduction "campaign" for the 1980 Census and then as the only female investigator among four headquarters staff with the Office of the Secretary, Office for Civil Rights, and U.S. Department of Commerce. She held similar positions in San Diego County in the late 1980’s.

During her "D.C. days," Mariko co-produced and co-hosted "Gold Mountain, D.C.," a jazz and information show on WPFW 89.3 FM, one of the Pacific Foundation radio affiliates. Classic R&B remains one of her mainstays.

Mariko has been married to Janlee Wong, also a social worker, since 1983, and has resided in Davis, CA, since 1994. They are the parents of two adult daughters.

 

  • Service Employees International Union of California
  • California Nurses Association
  • National Women's Political Caucus of California
  • National Union of Healthcare Workers
  • Davis Democratic Club
  • Label GMOs Napa County
  • Congressman John Garamendi
1.
Drought

Climate changes and the continuing drought worry many in California. What new strategies do you believe would ensure that California is able to both satisfy its water needs and protect the environment? Please be specific.

Answer from Mariko Yamada:

The global warming that is giving rise to climate change, sea-level rise, ocean acidification, the drought and resulting wildfires and tree die-offs is at the tipping point.  We must first redefine our relationship to water as a finite natural resource.  We, especially in Northern California, have been blessed by a heretofore abundance of this liquid gold, the shortage of which has now gotten all our attention.

We must invest in innovative technologies including water conservation, recycling, reuse, desalination, and strategic storage.  I am opposed to the Twin Tunnels--you cannot save the Delta by destroying it.  We should take a page from other countries in the world who have addressed their chronic water shortages in a more comprehensive way.  We have much to learn from other nations about how to do more with less water. 

I served for six years on the Assembly Water, Parks, and Wildlife Committee, as well as the Assembly Select Committee on Regional Approaches to Solving the State's Water Crisis.  I will lead on these issues in the State Senate.

2.
Fiscal Priorities

What are your top three fiscal priorities, recognizing the need to balance the state’s income with its spending? 

Answer from Mariko Yamada:

1.Californians are still recovering from the economic storm brought on by Wall Street greed. As we fight to close the gap between the rich and poor, we need leaders who understand that the economic recovery has been uneven. Rising education and health care costs have outpaced stagnating income. The social safety net that previous generations could rely upon has been shredded.

As State Senator, I will work to level the playing field for all Californians. I will also work to make sure that everyone pays their fair share – including support for Proposition 55, which extends the Proposition 30 tax on higher income earners for 12 years.  Closing the corporate loopholes in Proposition 13 also needs to be examined.

I will make the case for social, economic, educational and environmental justice for all Californians. In Sacramento, my priority will be to represent the poor and middle class families over corporate special interests.

2. I support making the first two years of community college free for every California student who meets the requirements. They should have an opportunity to acquire the skills they need for a good-paying job, without having to take on thousands of dollars in debt that puts them in a hole before they’ve even started. That’s the key to helping more young people and their families reach the middle class. To make this investment in our next generation of leaders will require a partnership between the federal and state government and examining new revenue sources including an oil severance tax.

3. I served as Chair of the  Assembly Aging and Long-Term Care Committee for five years. As State Senator, one of my top priorities will be to establish the first Senate Committee on Aging and Long-Term Care to serve as the policy locus for issues related to California’s “Silver Tsunami”.

Over the last decade, the number of California seniors age 65 and older living in poverty has nearly doubled, due in large part to rising housing and health care costs. Without a serious effort to address the challenges faced by California’s aging population, the stress placed on our state’s resources threatens to limit the opportunities available to younger generations.

3.
High Cost of Living

If elected, what solutions do you propose to deal with the high cost of living in the Bay Area?

Answer from Mariko Yamada:

The high-cost of living in the Bay Area is the product of a number of factors, including housing stock and availability; the high-tech industry that raises salaries; and an earlier-than-required localized increase to the minimum wage, which will go statewide incrementally over the next few years.  The latter is a step in the right direction that I support--but it has the effect of raising other costs simultaneously.

To address the high cost of living in the Bay Area requires a multi-faceted approach, including making the minimum wage a living wage; moving to a single-payer universal healthcare system that will ultimately save money and result in improved health outcomes; invest in realistic housing; streamline regulations affecting small businesses and provide tax incentives to create good paying-jobs; consider rent control and additional rent subsidies; provide child- and elder-care services to support working families and businesses.

4.
Minimum Wage

There are a variety of proposals to raise California's minimum wage. Many of these proposals face opposition from business groups who are concerned that they would kill jobs. Do you support increasing the minimum wage in California?  In your answer please explain your position on the relationship between wages and jobs with specific reference to the situation in your district. 

Answer from Mariko Yamada:

Yes, I support raising the miniumum wage, and the Legislature acted on this in 2015.  In a free-market, capitalistic economy, the relationship between wages and jobs "right-sizes" by passing the costs onto the consumer.  I believe we will see some small businesses unable to do so and still remain competitive.  There will be adjustments required, but I ulimately believe the overall economy will improve.  With more money in the hands of working families, there will be more spending to support the local economy.

5.
Money in Politics

Many Californians are concerned about the influence of money in politics. What can the state legislature do to ensure that decision-making by elected officials is not swayed by moneyed interests at the expense of constituents?

Answer from Mariko Yamada:

I agree.  The California State Legislature can lead in supporting Proposition 59, this year's advisory measure on Citizens United.  Leadership could also refrain from picking winners-and-losers in competitive races under the Top Two Primary system, that has resulted in the rise of the "Mods" in the Democratic Caucus.  A move towards true campaign expenditure limits and public financing of campaigns would be another step towards reducing the influence of money in politics.  Finally, legislation that strengthens the current "watchdog" function of the Fair Political Practices Commission should be introduced and supported.

6.
Traffic Congestion

What steps are needed to improve region-wide transportation planning and the growing traffic congestion?

Answer from Mariko Yamada:

Region-wide transportation planning is already at work in the 3rd State Senate District through both county-wide and regional transportation planning agencies such as the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.  However, getting people out of their cars requires a jobs-housing balance that enables people to live closer to where they work.  Alternative work schedules and providing child and elder care near work sites could reduce VMT's (vehicle miles traveled).

Total money raised: $558,870

Below are the top contributors that gave money to support the candidate(s).

1
California Federation of Teachers
$17,000
2
YAMADA, MARIKO M.
$14,000
3
State of California
$9,375
4
California Nurses Association
$9,000
5
Service Employees International Union
$8,900

By State:

California 96.28%
Virginia 1.64%
District of Columbia 1.62%
Colorado 0.12%
Other 0.35%
96.28%

By Size:

Large contributions (92.80%)
Small contributions (7.20%)
92.80%

By Type:

From organizations (42.05%)
From individuals (57.95%)
42.05%57.95%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.

I am a lifelong Democrat and a professional social worker in public service for the past 42 years, with an abiding commitment to the most vulnerable in our society.  I believe in prevention and intervention before detention, and have always been an advocate for the most vulnerable in our society.  Providing equal access to opportunities to achieve self-sufficiency over dependency is a top priority. I would describe myself as a pragmatic liberal.

Eight Issue Areas

Summary

A brief description of Mariko's eight most important priorities as a State Senator.

Economic Inequality

As a social worker for more than 40 years, Mariko Yamada has worked directly with families going through tough times. She understands that too many Californians struggle because low-wages and rising costs stack the system against them.

Californians are still recovering from the economic storm brought on by Wall Street greed. As we fight to close the gap between the rich and poor, we need leaders who understand that the economic recovery has been uneven. Rising education and health care costs have outpaced stagnating income. The social safety net that previous generations could rely upon has been shredded.

As State Senator, Mariko will work to level the playing field for all Californians. She’ll work to make sure that everyone pays their fair share – including support for extending the Prop 30 tax on millionaires and billionaires, and closing the corporate loopholes in Prop 13.

Mariko will make the case for social, economic, educational and environmental justice for all Californians. In Sacramento, she’ll represent the poor and middle class families over corporate special interests.

Protecting Our Environment

Mariko understands the delicate balance that must be maintained to preserve the character of our region. Dating back to her nine years of service with the Yolo County Board of Supervisors, Mariko has always been a leading advocate for open space and agricultural preservation. She will protect the natural and water resources on which our region’s prosperity depends.

Contrary to the claims of figures on the national stage, the looming threat of climate change is real. While her main opponent has taken a walk from key legislative votes that would protect our environment, Mariko has a reputation for always taking a stand when it comes to protecting our environment. That’s why she’s endorsed by the CA League of Conservation Voters. She’ll combat climate change and support efforts to reduce carbon emissions that put the health of our children and our local economy at risk.

Water

Four consecutive years of drought have endangered our region’s multi-billion dollar farm industry. Farmers and farmworkers have borne a significant share of the drought’s burden. And the impending threat of climate change means that these are problems that all of us will continue to face in the years ahead.

Considering the vital role that water plays in the Third State Senate District, this is not the time to be enabling the shipping away of our critical water resources. We should be investing in innovative technology and recycling programs to reduce water use, not destroying the largest fresh water estuary in the Northern Hemisphere to ship water resources to Southern California. Mariko has been a consistent and vocal opponent of the Governor’s Delta tunnels proposals, and will continue to oppose efforts to deprive our region of scarce water resources.

Food Safety

Every family in California should have access to affordable, healthy food, free from harmful toxins.

As State Senator, one of Mariko’s first actions would be to introduce legislation requiring the labeling of genetically modified foods in California. Going further, Mariko supports an outright ban on GMOs in grocery stores until GMOs are proven safe. We must have a better understanding of the long-term health effects and potential impact of allergens before exposing our children to these risks. We can explore ways to meet the growing demands on our global food supply and to alleviate the harm of resistant viruses and bacteria on crops, but these efforts must be weighed against the ability of parents to know what they are feeding their children.

Mariko will work to safeguard our food and water supply, instead of letting corporations like Monsanto win the fight against consumers.

Consumer Protection

Almost eight years ago, recklessness on Wall Street crippled our nation’s economy – but it was families on Main Street who paid the price. Big banks had brought on the economic crisis by gambling with other people’s money and selling their customers financial products they knew they couldn’t afford. And even after taxpayers bailed them out, they’re right back to their old ways while working families are still struggling to dig out of the hole they were left in.

As State Senator, Mariko will stand up for families instead of corporate interests. She’ll protect seniors against credit card fraud, instead of letting big banks off the hook. She’s the kind of leader California needs to stand up against corporate special interests and will fight to strengthen middle class families.

Seniors & Long-term Care

Mariko knows what it’s like to care for an aging parent while trying to raise a family; she was the primary caregiver for a parent for 23 years while raising her own two daughters. She clearly understands that as the Baby Boomer generation reaches retirement age, more and more families will face complex caregiving challenges.

Mariko has taken that experience and applied it to her service in public office. She chaired the Assembly’s Aging and Long-Term Care Committee for five years. As State Senator, one of her top priorities will be to establish the first Senate Committee on Aging and Long-Term Care to serve as the policy locus for issues related to California’s “Silver Tsunami”.

Over the last decade, the number of California seniors age 65 and older living in poverty has nearly doubled, due in large part to rising housing and health care costs. Without a serious effort to address the challenges faced by California’s aging population, the stress placed on our state’s resources threatens to limit the opportunities available to younger generations.

Health & Mental Health Care

While Obamacare has made significant progress in reducing the number of uninsured Americans and slowing the growth of health care costs, we are still a long way from solving the problems that plague our nation’s and our state’s health care systems. Meanwhile, members of the Republican Party, corporate interests, and the big insurance companies threaten to undo any progress we’ve made.

We must ensure that every Californian has access to quality, affordable health care. Health care costs constitute a significant chunk of our state’s budget, and remain one of the most important issues facing our state in the years ahead. Working conditions in our state institutions are also a significant concern. Mariko chaired the Select Committee on State Hospital and State Developmental Center Safety to address deficiencies in these state institutions.

We must finally treat mental health as an integrated component of overall health care instead of something separate or taboo, especially considering the close link between mental health and our state’s homelessness crisis. Mariko will continue to raise awareness for mental health issues and advocate for expanded services for all Californians. Mariko finds unacceptable that a growing number of people are on the streets because mental health services aren’t available. Mariko served as the Homeless Liaison for Yolo County while serving nine years on the Yolo County Board of Supervisors.

Mariko believes it essential that our health care and mental health care systems meet the needs of the brave men and women who served in our armed forces when they return home. Mariko served on the Assembly Veterans Affairs Committee for six years, leaving as its senior member.

Free Community College

Now more than ever, education is the key that opens the doors of opportunity. But too many students who have done everything right and pursued a higher education are finding that not to be the case. They’re graduating without employment prospects in a difficult job market, and overwhelmed by the crushing burden of student debt.

Higher education should be an experience that expands opportunities for the future, not a burden that limits them. To restore the promise that higher education once held for previous generations, we need to ensure that it is affordable and accessible for every young person who is willing to put in the work.

That’s why Mariko supports making the first two years of community college free for every California student who meets the requirements. They should have an opportunity to acquire the skills they need for a good-paying job, without having to take on thousands of dollars in debt that put them in a hole before they’ve even started. That’s the key to helping more young people and their families reach the middle class. To make this investment in our next generation of leaders will require a partnership between the federal and state government and examining new revenue sources including an oil severance tax.

Events

Videos

 

The League of Women Voters of Benicia with the AAUW Benicia-Vallejo (CA) Branch sponsored a Candidates Forum on October 17, 2016. This third segment of the Forum featured candidates for California State Senate District 3, Mariko Yamada and Bill Dodd.

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